The Inner Child - Schumann, Debussy, Mompou, Ravel - Antonio Oyarzábal  (OR 7351 - 0685)    

 

Category: Piano - Romantic music - CD

Bar code: 0 651973 510685

 

The Inner Child

Schumann, Debussy, Mompou, Ravel - Antonio Oyarzábal

 

CD Tracks
 

1. Robert Schumann

Kinderscenen

 

2. Claude Debussy

Children's corner

 

3. Frederic Mompou

Escenas de niños

4. Maurice Ravel

Ma mère l'oye (piano solo)

 

 

The world of childhood has always been closely connected with music. Not surprisingly, music is the first innate vocal language that a person develops with immediate effect, long before the spoken word appears in the second or third year of life, to undo all the spells. Music is a natural space for children, and already since the Middle Ages, many musical manifestations in the West were intended to recall childhood universe under a number of different guises, many of which were related to the birth of Christ. During the Baroque period, and with the outbreak of the secular and bourgeois societies, children becam an important figure in the musical scene; music was, in fact, a craft learnt at the first stages of life, passed on from parents to children. This was the time of the emergence of child prodigies, of which Mozart represents the greatest historical example. Nevertheless, it was not until the appearance of poetic subjectivism in the Romantic period that the world of childhood really took over the core of musical means, thus, inhabiting its own poetic space. León Daudet said that poets are men who can still see the world through the eyes of children. Similarly, musicians are poets who can not only see the world through the eyes of children, but also speak with their deepest voice; a voice only to be expressed through sounds, through music.

Kinderszenen (Scenes of Childhood) is a set of short pieces written in 1838, during a stormy moment in the relationship between Schumann and Clara. Originally thirty pieces, Schumann decided to reduce the number to thirteen for his final version of the piece. The other seventeen pieces were later included in Bunte Blätter, op. 99 and in Albumblätter, op. 104. The original title was Kindergeschichten (Tales for Children), which reveals a literary source. Thomas Koenig refers to Hoffmann’s books for children, to which Schumann was very close, inspiring him to write his vast piece Kreisleriana shortly after Kinderszenen. Although not virtuosistic, Kinderszenen are only superficially easy. They are not written for children’s hands nor ears. Schumann’s aim was to create an intimate picture of the world of childhood for adults. At first sight, the pieces seem unrelated and randomly organized, but a deeper analysis proves that the piece has a solid and well planned inner structure. Moreover, it has sometimes even been described as a theme with variations.

Despite being written for Debussy’s first and only daughter Chouchou (2 years old at the time), Children’s corner (1907) is a set of six miniatures of the most refined simplicity, and none of them are written for children’s hands nor young listeners. The piece was written during a very difficult time in Debussy’s life, after he had divorced his first wife Lily (which resulted in her attempt to commit suicide). At this point he was in a committed relationship with Emma Bardac, from which Chouchou was born, and somehow this new situation made Debussy feel unlocked and free after a two-year period of time in which he had been creatively unproductive. In its deliberate simplicity and with its light and whimsical tone, Children’s corner represents an intimate interlude between two of Debussy’s biggest phases in his piano compositions. The piece is, for the performer, less technically demanding than in its need of great sensitivity, imagination, and a coordinated and very nuanced pulse that is capable of transmitting both the subtlest sense of humour and the most delicate emotion. Debussy (who was a renowned anglophile), chose English titles for every movement of Children’s corner as a little joke, in response to the Anglomania that was very dominant in France at that time.

“The contributions to musical expression made by Impressionism certainly allow us to discover a whole universe of wonderful sonorities, delicate as the most penetrating perfume. This style, born with Debussy, died with him too. After his death a rather immediate reaction towards clarity occurred; for a Mediterranean musician like me, nothing felt easier and more natural”. These are words by Federico Mompou, one of the greatest example of an artist that embodies the virtues of clarity, simplicity in the form, and purity of expression. Scènes d’enfant is a clear model of expressive efficiency, of simplicity in the writting and precision in the tone. They express very distinctly Mompou’s desire of musical redevelopment, which in the words of Roger Prevel “it represents a fresh start from what it already exists. Ultimately it is not a return to something or someone in particular (a trend that only gives birth to the “neo” movements), but an attempt to see the world from another perspective”. The musical view of the modest Mompou is one of the most personal ones in the whole first half of the XX century.

Written for Mimi and Jean, son and daughter of his friends Ida and Cipa Godbski, Ma mère l’Oye is a clear evidence of Ravel’s enthusiasm for the world of childhood (he would retake this topic for L’enfant et les sortilèges). He confessed: " The idea of evoking in these pieces the poetry of childhood naturally led me to simplify my style and to refine my means of expression”. Based on the children tales by Charles Perrault (The Sleeping Beauty and Little Tom Thumb, both from the collection of Les Contes de ma mère l’Oye, 1697), by Madame Le Prince de Beaumont (The Beauty and the Beast, 1757), and by Madame Daulnoy (The Green Serpent, 1697). The piece was originally written for piano four hands between 1908 and 1910. Ravel would soon afterwards orchestrate it, turn it into a ballet, and it was finally transcribed for piano solo by Jacques Charlot (which is the version performed in this CD).

 

ESPAÑOL

 

Categorría: Piano - Música romántica - CD

 

The Inner Child

Schumann, Debussy, Mompou, Ravel - Antonio Oyarzábal

 

CD Tracks
 

1. Robert Schumann

Kinderscenen, "Escenas de la Infancia"

 

2. Claude Debussy

Children's corner, "El rincón de los niños"

 

3. Frederic Mompou

Escenas de niños

4. Maurice Ravel

Ma mère l'oye (versión piano solo)

 

 

El mundo infantil ha estado desde siempre estrechamente vinculado con el hecho musical. No en vano la música es el primer lenguaje articulado que una persona logra aprehender de manera inmediata, mucho antes de que en el segundo o tercer año de la vida el verbo irrumpa para deshacer los hechizos. La música es para el niño un espacio natural, y ya desde la Edad Media muchas manifestaciones musicales en occidente estaban destinadas a evocar ese universo infantil bajo una gran diversidad de ópticas, muchas de ellas relacionadas con la natividad de Cristo. Durante el período barroco, con la irrupción de la sociedad secular y burguesa, la figura del niño pasó a ser central en la práctica musical; la música era un oficio que se aprendía desde las primeras fases de la vida y que se transmitía de padres a hijos. Sería el periodo de floración de los niños prodigio, de los que Mozart sería el mayor exponente histórico. Sin embargo, habrá que esperar hasta el subjetivismo poético del Romanticismo para ver al mundo de la infancia penetrar el interior y apoderarse del medio musical, habitar en él como espacio poético propio. Decía León Daudet que los poetas son hombres que han conservado sus ojos de niño. Los músicos serían entonces aquellos poetas que no sólo han conservado los ojos del niño, sino también su voz más profunda, esa que no puede ser expresada más que por medio de sonidos, de música. 

Las breves piezas que componen las Kinderszenen (Escenas de niños) fueron escritas en 1838, durante el periodo del complicado noviazgo entre Schumann y Clara. Originalmente eran treinta, pero Schumann las redujo a trece para la versión definitiva. Las diecisiete restantes fueron incluidas más tarde en Bunte Blätter, op. 99 y en Albumblätter, op. 104. El título original era Kindergeschichten (Cuentos de niños) lo que revela un origen literario. Thomas Koenig remite a los cuentos infantiles de Hoffmann, autor muy próximo a Schumann y sobre el que escribiría, poco después de las Kinderszenen, la titánica Kreisleriana. Aunque alejadas de cualquier virtuosismo, las Escenas de niños son solo aparentemente sencillas, y no están pensadas para manos y oídos infantiles. El propósito de Schumann era crear una representación interior del mundo de la infancia para los adultos. En apariencia se trata de piezas inconexas y ordenadas de forma arbitraria, pero un análisis atento demuestra que la obra posee una estructura interna sólida y consciente. Algunos han visto en la obra una especie de tema con variaciones.

 

Pese a haber sido escrita para la primera y única hija de Debussy, Chouchou, de dos años, las seis miniaturas de refinada sencillez que integran Children’s corner (1907) tampoco están pensadas para manos infantiles, ni escritas para jóvenes oyentes. La obra está compuesta en un momento difícil en la vida del músico, tras la separación y el intento de suicidio de su primera esposa, Lilly, y su relación con Emma Bardac -de la que nació Chouchou- y de alguna manera supone el desbloqueo a un periodo de infertilidad creativa de casi dos años. En su buscada sencillez y su tono ligero y caprichoso, Children’s corner representa un interludio íntimo entre dos grandes etapas de composición para piano de Debussy. La obra exige del intérprete menos virtuosismo que sensibilidad, imaginación y una pulsación matizada capaz de transmitir tanto el humor más sutil como la emoción más delicada. Los títulos ingleses de la obra y de cada una de las piezas son una broma de Debussy –él mismo un conocido anglófilo- respecto de la anglomanía imperante en Francia en esa época. Un humor ligero e incisivo impera por doquier. 

“No hay duda de que el aporte del impresionismo a la expresión musical nos ha hecho descubrir un universo de maravillosas sonoridades, sensible como el más penetrante perfume. Este estilo, nacido con Debussy, se extinguió con su muerte. Después de su fallecimiento se produjo una reacción inmediata a favor de un retorno a la claridad; para un músico mediterráneo como yo, nada era más fácil ni más natural”. Son palabras del catalán Federico Mompou, un artista que encarna como ningún otro las virtudes de la claridad, de la simplicidad de forma y de medios, de la pureza de expresión. Las Scènes d’enfants son un modelo de eficacia expresiva, de simplicidad de la escritura y de precisión en el tono, y expresan con nitidez el deseo de renovación musical de Mompou, un deseo que según Roger Prevel “supone una vuelta a empezar a partir de lo que ya existe. En el fondo no es un retorno a algo o a alguien, tendencia que solo ha dado lugar a los movimientos “neo” –clásicos u otros- sino que trata de ver el mundo con otro mirar”. La mirada musical del discreto Mompou es una de las más personales de la primera mitad del XX.

Escrita para Mimi y Jean, los hijos de sus amigos Ida y Cipa Godebski, Ma mère l’Oye es un testimonio de la inclinación de Ravel por el mundo de la infancia (la temática infantil se retomará en L’enfant et les sortilèges). El propio compositor confesó: “El designio de evocar en esas piezas la poesía de la infancia me condujo naturalmente a simplificar mi manera y a despejar mi escritura”. Basada en cuentos de Charles Perrault (La Bella durmiente del bosque y Pulgarcito, ambos pertenecientes a la colección Les Contes de ma mère l’Oye, 1697), de Madame Le Prince de Beaumont (La Belle et la Bête, 1757), y de Madame Daulnoy (Le Serpentin vert, 1697), la obra fue originalmente fue compuesta como una suite para piano a cuatro manos entre 1908 y 1910. Ravel la orquestaría, la convertiría en ballet y finalmente Jacques Charlot escribiría una reducción para piano a dos manos, que es la versión interpretada en este programa. 

© 2020 by Orpheus Music

info@orpheusclassical.com    

 

SPAIN: Gran Via 6, 4º - 28013 (Madrid)

FRANCE: 66, Avenue des Champs Elysées - 75008 (Paris)

USA: 576, 5th Avenue, 9th Floor - 10.036 (New York)

  • Facebook Social Icon