Scriabin: The complete Preludes
Eduardo Fernández

Scriabin: The complete Preludes 

Eduardo Fernández - piano  (OR 6493 - 3485)    

Category: Piano - Russian music  - CD

Scriabin: The complete Preludes

Bar code: 8 436564 933485

CD Tracks

CD 1

1. Prelude Op 2 No 2    01:11

2. Prelude for the left hand Op 9 No 1    02:50

3-26.Twenty-Four Preludes Op 11    34:37

27-32. Six Preludes Op 13    08:40

33-37. Five Preludes Op 15    06:39

38-42. Five Preludes Op 16    08:25

Duration    62:22

CD 2

1-7. Seven Preludes Op 17    11:59

8-11. Four Preludes Op 22    05:32

12-13. Two Preludes Op 27    03:09

14-17. Four Preludes Op 31    05:56

18-21. Four Preludes Op 33    04:16

22-24. Three Preludes Op 35    06:13

25-28. Four Preludes Op 37    06:57

29-32. Four Preludes Op 39    05:30

33. Prelude Op 45 No 3    01:32

34-37. Four Preludes Op 48    04:11  

38.  Prelude Op 49 No 2    01:10

39. Prelude Op 51 No 2    02:47

40. Prelude Op 56 No 1    01:02

41. Prelude Op 59 No 2    01:33

42-43. Two Preludes Op 67    03:35

44-48. Five Preludes Op 74    07:54

Duration  73:16

The prelude is the best represented genre in the catalogue of Scriabin: the musician wrote ninety in an span of time between 1888 and 1914, the date of composition of the 5 Preludes op. 74, his last work. If large forms (symphony and sonata) represented for Scriabin vehicles for the expression of philosophical and mystical contents of the universal reality, then the prelude encompassed the direct expression of the artist's subjectivity. Scriabin inherited Chopin's idea of prelude as a short piece of a broad expressive spectrum (from lyric to dramatic, although with predominance of the first) and with a chameleon-like ability to assume the most varied appearances.

Scriabin organized his preludes in a homogeneous series, starting with the 24 Preludes op. 11 (1888-1896). The composer displays here a wide expressive range, together with an efficient use of all the piano resources.

 

The creative debt incurred by the 24 Preludes opus 28 of Chopin is manifested in both the musical language and the global architecture of the collection. Despite the substantial adherence to the chosen model, there is no lack of glimmer of originality. Where can we predict the future Scriabin? Perhaps in the delicate chromatic style of Preludes Nos 2 and 10; in the air spirals of No. 3 (which overlaps binary and ternary figurations); or the fierce drama of No. 6, digging in the low register of the instrument with its imitative octaves. We will have to draw attention also to the original rhythmic construction of some numbers: as the 15/8 of the impetuous prelude nº14, or the metric alternation between 5/8 and 4/8 of the mysterious prelude No. 16, and the one that also occurs between 6/ 8 and 5/8 of nº 24. It is not surprising, in this sophisticated context, to find the refined simplicity of Prelude No. 15, reminiscent of the most sober Liszt.

 

After opus 11, Scriabin had planned to write another collection of twenty-four preludes, but the editor objected to the commercial viability of a second collection of these characteristics. Preludes op. 13, 15, 16 and 17, written in the space of two years (1894-1896) for a total of twenty pieces, are possibly the scattered remains of that great project. To this, the 4 Preludes op. 22, of 1897, must be added. There is a widespread consensus on the relevance of these preludes with regard to opus 11, but these reserves should not detract attention from some undoubted successes, as the Prelude op. 13 No. 2, whose transfigured lightness results in a volitional final, a very common phenomenon in Scriabin's temperament; or the tense Prelude op. 13 No. 6, which looks like the first draft of a sonata movement. Prelude op. 16 nº 1 is a nocturne that could have been stolen from Chopin, but whose lunar lightness belongs to Scriabin. The mood changes in Prelude Opus 16 nº 2 are also representative of this Russian composer’s style.

 

Preludes op. 27 (1899-1900) marked a transition to a more personal and mature language, whose first signs can be seen in Preludes op. 31, 33, 35, 37 and 39, written almost entirely in 1903. These pieces present an increasingly tormented profile and a destabilizing chromatic language. Also, the last period of Liszt had surrendered to the sibylline charm of chromatic music, but in parallel with the search for a progressively more laconic and essential writing. The Lisztian chromatic language had an ascetic taste: it represented the enigmatic background of things when the consoling and obliging veil of appearances is removed. On the contrary, Scriabin’s chromatic style is steeped in voluptuousness; it arises due to an overload of impulses, desires and feelings. The composer does not reach it by reduction or containment, but quite the opposite: by multiplication of changing and contradictory effects.

 

Scriabin scores' own appearance, with almost as many altered notes as natural notes, is symptomatic: the proliferation of signs and accidental notes on the paper communicates to the interpreter a sense of esoteric density which makes a direct reading difficult.

 

Prelude op. 33 # 1 is the expression of a voluptuous and uncertain lyricism that still finds a temporary break in the tonal resolution of the closing stages. At the beginning of the pieces, the presence of almost poetic and expressive indications that the listener doesn’t know, but that the performer must somehow internalize is even more frequent. "Daring, bellicose," writes the composer at the beginning of the Prelude op. 33 No. 4, and seems to return to the Greek doctrine of ethos. Preludes op. 35 No. 2 and op. 39 No. 2 have instead the indication "High". They are almost cosmic dark spaces of reflection, where melody and harmony converge towards a single space, they are configured as horizontal and vertical axes of a single sound substance.

 

The four Preludes op. 48 (1904-1905) culminate the process undertaken in previous collections. No. 1 is a wild and impetuous outbreak of energy; No. 2 is a lyrical study of the slight dynamics (between p and ppp); No. 3 hosts capricious and arduous impulses (overlapping of binary and ternary figurations); No. 4 has the features of a festive and Dionysian celebration.

 

The order of pieces suggests the image of a condensed sonata in minimum space, but it would not be absurd to contemplate an alchemical reading of the pieces as sound allegories of the four elements: earth, water, air and fire. The optimistic closing of opus 48 reflects a key aspect of Scriabin’s poetics. Life in the Universe -and by extension, the music that represents it- is based on the struggle between opposing principles: light and dark, good and evil ... As dramatic as it may be, this conflict is positive as long as it involves a principle of transcendence, of conquest, of impetus forward thanks to cosmos and to the individual progress towards new and expanded horizons.

 

With the 2 Preludes op. 67 (1912-1913) and the 5 Preludes Op.74 (1914) we enter the final stage of Scriabin, the most visionary and personal one. Prelude op. 67 nº 1 develops, on a regular and hypnotic movement, a type of metaphysical regret that responds to the restless dynamism of prelude No. 2. The mystic chord -based on the superimposition of fourths- is already an achieved fact; its presence helps to blur the gap between the thematic axis and the harmonic axis, creating new connections and relationships between sounds.

 

The 5 Preludes op. 74 are the last work written by Scriabin, who died months later from septicaemia. Perhaps, the composer had wished to end his catalogue in a great and incomparable way (in fact, he worked on the project Mysterium). This does not mean that only these six minutes of music are among his most revolutionary productions. Here, as in the Sonatas for Piano No. 9 and 10 or en Vers la Flamme, the fusion between technical and spiritual principles is absolute, and the sound material draws landscapes that seem from other worlds. From the excruciating pain of Prelude No. 1, through the immobile and obsessive contemplation of No. 2, to the restless spirals of No. 3, and finally, the opaque and timeless litany of No. 4. By contrast, No. 5 offers a fierce and warlike conclusion, with its ascending arpeggios and its imperious and eager impulses.

Scriabin's trajectory is closed this way with a final act of rebellion, enshrining the full identification of the author with the mythical figure of Prometheus, who dared to challenge the divine mandate and gave fire to man, thus giving rise to civilization. With his music, Scriabin intended to deliver to posterity another no less important fire, able to reveal to man through the sounds the ultimate essence of the Universe and the Divine.

Stefano Russomanno

ESPAÑOL

Category: Piano - Russian music  - CD

Scriabin: The complete Preludes

Bar code: 8 436564 933485

Listado de pistas

CD 1

1. Prelude Op 2 No 2    01:11

2. Prelude for the left hand Op 9 No 1    02:50

3-26.Twenty-Four Preludes Op 11    34:37

27-32. Six Preludes Op 13    08:40

33-37. Five Preludes Op 15    06:39

38-42. Five Preludes Op 16    08:25

Duration    62:22

CD 2

1-7. Seven Preludes Op 17    11:59

8-11. Four Preludes Op 22    05:32

12-13. Two Preludes Op 27    03:09

14-17. Four Preludes Op 31    05:56

18-21. Four Preludes Op 33    04:16

22-24. Three Preludes Op 35    06:13

25-28. Four Preludes Op 37    06:57

29-32. Four Preludes Op 39    05:30

33. Prelude Op 45 No 3    01:32

34-37. Four Preludes Op 48    04:11  

38.  Prelude Op 49 No 2    01:10

39. Prelude Op 51 No 2    02:47

40. Prelude Op 56 No 1    01:02

41. Prelude Op 59 No 2    01:33

42-43. Two Preludes Op 67    03:35

44-48. Five Preludes Op 74    07:54

Duration  73:16

El preludio es el género mejor representado en el catálogo de Scriabin: noventa escribe el músico en un arco de tiempo comprendido entre 1888 y 1914, fecha de composición de los 5 Preludios op. 74, su última obra.

Scriabin organizaba preferentemente sus preludios en series homogéneas, empezando por los 24 Preludios op. 11 (1888-96). El compositor despliega aquí un abanico expresivo muy amplio, unido a un eficaz aprovechamiento de todos los recursos del piano. Manifiesta es la deuda contraída con los 24 Preludios opus 28 de Chopin en lo que respecta tanto al lenguaje musical como a la arquitectura global de la colección.

 

Después del opus 11, Scriabin tenía pensado escribir otra colección de veinticuatro preludios, pero el editor puso reparos a la viabilidad comercial de una segunda colección de esas características. Los preludios op. 13, 15, 16 y 17, escritos en el arco de dos años (1894-96) por un total de veintitrés piezas, son posiblemente los restos esparcidos de aquel gran proyecto. A ellos hay que añadir los 4 Preludios op. 22, de 1897. Existe un consenso generalizado sobre la menor relevancia de estos preludios con respecto a los del opus 11, pero estas reservas no deben desviar la atención de algunos aciertos indudables, como el Preludio op. 13 nº 2, cuya transfigurada ligereza desemboca en un final volitivo muy propio del temperamento de Scriabin; o el tenso Preludio op. 13 nº 6, que parece el esbozo de un movimiento de sonata. El Preludio op. 16 nº 1 es un nocturno que podría haber sido robado a Chopin, pero cuyo claror lunar pertenece a Scriabin. Representativos del compositor ruso son también los cambios anímicos del Preludio opus 16 nº 2.

 

Los Preludios op. 27 (1899-1900) marcan una transición hacia un lenguaje más personal y maduro, cuyas primeras señales se divisan en los Preludios op. 31, 33, 35, 37 y 39, escritos en su práctica totalidad a lo largo de 1903. Estas piezas presentan un perfil cada vez más atormentado y un cromatismo desestabilizador.

 

El Preludio op. 33 nº 1 es la expresión de un lirismo voluptuoso e incierto que encuentra todavía un temporáneo descanso en la resolución tonal de los últimos compases. Cada vez más frecuente es, al principio de las piezas, la presencia de indicaciones expresivas casi poemáticas que el oyente desconoce pero que el intérprete debe de alguna manera interiorizar. “Atrevido, belicoso”, escribe el compositor al comienzo del Preludio op. 33 nº 4, y parece volver a la doctrina griega de los ethoi. Los Preludios op. 35 nº 2 y op. 39 nº 2 llevan en cambio la expresión “Elevado”: son espacios sombríos de reflexión casi cósmica, en donde melodía y armonía convergen hacia un espacio único, se configuran como ejes horizontal y vertical de una única sustancia sonora.

 

Los 4 Preludios op. 48 (1904-05) culminan el proceso emprendido en las colecciones anteriores. El nº 1 es un estallido salvaje e impetuoso de energía; el nº 2 es un lírico estudio sobre las dinámicas leves (entre p y ppp); el nº 3 es presa de impulsos caprichosos y afanosos (con superposición de figuraciones binarias y ternarias); el nº 4 tiene los rasgos de una celebración festiva y dionisíaca. El orden de las piezas sugiere la imagen de una sonata condensada en espacios mínimos, pero no sería descabellada una lectura alquímica de las piezas como alegorías sonoras de los cuatro elementos: tierra, agua, aire y fuego. La clausura optimista del opus 48 refleja un aspecto clave de la poética de Scriabin. La vida del Universo –y, por extensión la música que lo representa- se basa en la lucha entre principios opuestos: la luz y la oscuridad, el bien y el mal… Por dramático que sea, este conflicto es positivo en tanto en cuanto implica un principio de trascendencia, de conquista, de impulso hacia delante gracias al cual cosmos e individuo progresan hacia horizontes nuevos y superiores.

Con los 2 Preludios op. 67 (1912-13) y los 5 Preludios op.74 (1914) nos adentramos en la última etapa de Scriabin, la más visionaria y personal. El Preludio op. 67 nº 1 desarrolla, sobre un movimiento regular e hipnótico, una suerte de lamento metafísico al que responde el dinamismo inquieto del preludio nº 2. El acorde místico –basado en la superposición de cuartas- es ya un hecho consumado; su presencia contribuye a difuminar las distancias entre eje temático y eje armónico, creando nuevas conexiones y relaciones entre sonidos.

Los 5 Preludios op. 74 son la última obra escrita por Scriabin, quien falleció meses más tarde por una septicemia. Quizá el compositor hubiese deseado finalizar su catálogo de una manera grandiosa e incomparable (no en vano, trabajaba en el proyecto del Mysterium). Ello no quita que estos escasos seis minutos de música figuren entre sus hallazgos más revolucionarios. Aquí, como en las Sonatas para piano nº 9 y 10 o en Vers la flamme, la fusión entre principio técnico y principio espiritual es absoluta, y la materia sonora dibuja paisajes que parecen de otros mundos. Desde el dolor lacerante del preludio nº 1, pasando por la contemplación inmóvil y obsesiva del nº 2, las espirales inquietas del nº 3, la letanía opaca e intemporal del nº 4. Por contraste, el nº 5 aporta una conclusión fiera y belicosa, con sus arpegios ascendentes y sus impulsos imperiosos y anhelantes.

La trayectoria de Scriabin se cierra así con un último acto de rebeldía, consagrando la plena identificación del autor con la mítica figura de Prometeo, que se atrevió a desafiar el mandato divino y entregó el fuego al hombre, dando inicio a la civilización. Con su música, Scriabin pretendía entregar a la posteridad otro fuego no menos importante, capaz de revelar al hombre por medio de los sonidos la esencia última del Universo y de lo Divino.

Stefano Russomanno

 

Stefano Russomanno

© 2020 by Orpheus Music

info@orpheusclassical.com    

 

SPAIN: Gran Via 6, 4º - 28013 (Madrid)

FRANCE: 66, Avenue des Champs Elysées - 75008 (Paris)

USA: 576, 5th Avenue, 9th Floor - 10.036 (New York)

  • Facebook Social Icon